Home > Posts tagged "Haiti"

5 Years of DACA and the Future of TPS

Courtesy: Fanm Ayisyen Nan Miyami

Last week marked the five-year anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program, which grants protection from deportation to many young immigrants.  In the five years since the announcement of DACA, an estimated 95% of DACA youth and young adults  are either working or attending school, contributing to their local communities and the economy.

On Thursday, the White House announced it would continue to leave the program untouched, maintaining the existing protections from deportation for nearly 800,000 “DREAMers.” While we at the Florida Immigrant Coalition celebrate the news that these young people are receiving the security that should be afforded to them, we remain highly vigilant of our Haitian brothers and sisters who have not been afforded these similar and necessary protections.

Temporary Protective Status (TPS) grants individuals hailing from certain designated countries struck by natural disasters or armed conflict, such as Haiti, with authorization to remain legally in the United States. More than 58,000 Haitians are members of the program, after a disastrous earthquake ravished the island in 2011. TPS allows for recipients to remain in the U.S. with valid work permits until the unrest in their country of origin abates.

While TPS extensions are normally offered for 18 months, the Trump administration disappointingly took the unprecedented step to shorten the duration of their protected status for only another six months. This six-month extension is not enough. The country is currently facing the worst cholera epidemic in the world, with about 40,000 people living in tent homes and makeshift shelters, while facing steep economic and political turmoil.

We encourage the administration to acknowledge the unrealistic term given to Haitian recipients, who are working and making a tangible contribution to our community and economy. Furthermore, we recognize that DACA and TPS fail to provide a plan toward legal integration of these communities to the this country where they have invested so much of their lives, skills, and dreams. True comprehensive immigration reform should comprise a pathway for these communities to realize their full potential as they advance toward citizenship.

Speak to your federal representative today and ask them what they are doing to #SaveTPS 202-224-3121.

MAY DAY – Join Us and Stand Against Hate and Racism

May 1st marks the International Workers’ Day, a historic day when workers and migrants join forces to demand dignity and justice. We must come together now more than ever and stand up to the hateful rhetoric spreading across our nation. A multiracial coalition of immigrant rights organizations, faith leaders, labor unions and local activists and artists are organizing a rally and march in Miami and we encourage all members to participate. Details for the May Day March in Miami event can be found below.
Are you having a local event on May 1st that FLIC can support?

Are you interested in attending the Miami May 1st event?

Please let us know of any May Day events around you so we can provide support or coordinate travel arraignments for those interested in attending the Miami event.


Miami Rally and March

Sunday, May 1st from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m.
March starts at Government Center (111 NW First Street Miami, Florida 33128) and ends at the Torch of Friendship (401 Biscayne Blvd, Miami, FL 33132

MAYDAY flyer ENG


El 1ro de Mayo marca el Día Internacional de los Trabajadores, un día histórico en el que trabajadores y migrantes se unen para exigir dignidad y justicia. Debemos unirnos ahora más que nunca y levantarnos en contra de la retórica de odio que actualmente está contaminando  nuestra nación . Una coalición multirracial de organizaciones Incluyendo grupos pro inmigrantes, líderes religiosos, sindicatos, activistas locales y artistas están organizando una manifestación y marcha en Miami e invitamos a todos los miembros a participar. Los detalles de la Marcha del Día del Trabajador en Miami pueden ser encontrados en la parte de abajo de este correo electrónico.

¿Tienes un evento local el 1 de mayo que FLIC puede apoyar?

¿Estás interesado en asistir a la Marcha de 1ro de Mayo en Miami?

Por favor déjenos saber de cualquier evento del Primero de Mayo alrededor de su área para que podamos ofrecer apoyo o coordinar viajes para las personas interesadas en asistir a el evento de Miami.

Manifestación y Marcha en Miami
Domingo, 1ro de Mayo de 2:00 a 4:00 p.m.
La Marcha empezara en el Government Center (111 NW First Street Miami, Florida 33128) y terminará en la Antorcha de la Amistad (401 Biscayne Blvd, Miami, FL 33132

MAYDAY flyer SPA

Haitians Impatient with Obama Over TPS

16133_182206878085_649088085_3875389_5979777_n

Making Our Voices Heard at the Fountainbleau Hotel in Miami Beach

by Francesca Guerrier & Kim Ives

Some 50 Haitians and their supporters held a spirited demonstration in front of the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach on Monday, Oct. 26 to demand that President Obama immediately grant Temporary Protected Status or TPS to some 35,000 undocumented Haitians currently in the US.

Obama was at the hotel for a fundraiser for Democratic Florida congressmen Alcee Hastings and Kendrick Meek, who is running for senator.

The demonstration was organized by the Haitian American Grassroots Coalition, Institute of Justice and Democracy (IJDH), Florida Immigrant Coalition (FLIC) and Free Haiti Now, all groups which had been expecting Obama to reverse the Bush administration’s denial of TPS to Haitians last December.

“We are all frustrated that more than nine months after President Obama’s inauguration Haitians still don’t have TPS despite the incredibly broad editorial and political support for it, including from the three South Florida Republicans in the US House of Representatives,” said Steve Forester, an immigration lawyer and long-time TPS advocate who presently represents the IJDH in Florida. “And we are doubly surprised that we have not yet gotten a response to our request to at least give people the dignity of the right to work while the administration continues, month after month, to review the propriety of granting TPS, which to us and every objective observer is a no-brainer, based on the four hurricanes and storms that hit Haiti in a one-month period a year ago.”

TPS, which briefly can be granted by executive order to undocumented immigrants in the U.S. who are temporarily unable to return to their nation because of a natural disaster, armed conflict, or other extraordinary circumstances. Since it was established in 1990, TPS has been granted to immigrants from Nicaragua, El Salvador, Honduras, Burundi, Somalia, Montserrat, Sierra Leone, Sudan and Liberia.

Since January, many demonstrations demanding TPS for Haitians have been held in Florida and other states. Over 300 people from Florida and the Northeast traveled by bus to Washington, DC to demonstrate in front of the White House on Jun. 3, and many more turned out for a second demonstration there on Sep. 16.

On Sep. 18, Free Haiti Now, FLIC and Haitian Women in Miami (FANM) held a vigil at Virginia Key Beach on Key Biscayne to call for TPS and to pay respect to the many Haitian refugees who have died at sea. Performing at the protest were Miami artists DJ Khaled, Mecca aka Grimo, and Grindmode. Other celebrities also supported the action and the TPS call including M1 from Dead Prez, Black Dada, Ace Hood, NBA superstar Hudonis Haslem, and three artists from the group Poe Boy: Billy Blue, Brisco and Flo Rida.

“We need the administration to grant TPS or at least, while they are considering it, to grant work permits on a case by case basis to TPS-deserving non-criminal Haitians who desperately need work permits, drivers licenses and the ability to feed their families, pay electricity bills, and send remittances to Haiti which can support up to ten times that number, thereby increasing Haiti’s security and our own,” Forester said.

On Oct. 26, the demonstrators were restricted to a sidewalk across Collins Avenue from the Fontainebleau. The area was heavily guarded by U.S. Secret Service, Miami Beach police and private security guards. The police harassed demonstrators who sought to take pictures of the protest from the street.

Further down the sidewalk, a group of about 100 anti-immigrant “teabaggers” protested Obama’s presence in Miami with absurd signs like “Go back to Kenya” and “Go back to Indonesia” and “Obama = Comunism.” (sic)

Among those who came out to the TPS demonstration were a few Central American farmworkers from Homestead, about 25 Haitians from West Palm Beach, and FLIC staff members.

In March, former Haitian-American unionist Patrick Gaspard, now Obama’s Director for Political Affairs, traveled to Miami to soothe and reassure Haitian leaders that the administration would soon act on TPS. The reprieve he brokered has now expired.

“As far as we are concerned, regarding Haiti, the Obama administration is maintaining the same status quo as the Bush immigration policy,” Haitian-American Grassroots Coalition president Jean-Robert Lafortune told the Miami Herald.

All articles copyrighted Haiti Liberte. REPRINTS ENCOURAGED.
Please credit Haiti Liberte.

Miami City Commission Urges President Obama To Grant Temporary Protected Status To Haitians In The United States

Excellent news–hopefully more cities throughout Florida and the nation will pass similar resolutions!

http://www.sflcn.com/story.php?id=6535

MIAMI – City of Miami Commission Chairman Joe Sanchez, backed unanimously by the City of Miami Commission, passed a resolution Thursday, June 11, 2009, urging President Barrack Obama to grant temporary protected status (TPS) to Haitians in the United States.

“We are urgently calling on President Obama to do the right thing,” Sanchez said.

TPS suspends the deportation of undocumented Haitians already in the U.S. and allows the granting of work permits that can last up to 18 months.

“As a proud member of Miami’s Haitian community, and an advocate for the humanitarian treatment of all people, I am pleased that Chairman Sanchez and the City Commission is poised to set an example for the rest of the country to follow,” said Francesca Menes of the Florida Immigrant Coalition. Menes added, “Haiti has been devastated–environmentally and economically–and Temporary Protected Status would help Haitians here and abroad.”

Haitian workers in the United States support relatives back home with remittances to Haiti from the United States estimated to be more than $1 billion.

tps

“Hurricane season is upon us and the nation of Haiti has barely recovered from last season’s devastating storms. It is imperative that we grant temporary protected status to Haitians in the U.S., so their work here can help fuel the rebuilding back home,” Sanchez said.

Haiti: Honoring the Life of Father Gerard Jean-Juste

Father Jean-Juste was beloved by many and is dearly missed. Please join us in remembering his many contributions to the struggle for social justice in Haiti.

From the article: “Father Gerald Jean Juste risked the guns of the US Marines, UN troops, Haitian coup d’etat police, the dangers of their bullets, arrests and censure to walk with, and suffer with the disenfranchised and vilified residents in the populous neighborhoods of Haiti. He would not let the people stand and suffer alone.”

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pn4Mx6k0dNI&feature=player_embedded]

National Day of Solidarity: Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haitians

0404 met haititps 1.jpgOn May 13th, FLIC leaders from Miami, Palm Beach, Orlando and Jacksonville, as well as national allies from the Quixote Center, National Immigration Forum, SEIU, TransAfrica Forum, The Episcopal Church and Jesuit Refugee Service/USA, made their voices heard in Washington.

They met with officials from the Department of Homeland Security and The White House, as well as U.S. Representatives from Florida, including Kendrick Meek, Alcee Hastings, Corrine Brown, Alan Grayson, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, as well as Maxine Waters (CA). We met with both Florida senators, Bill Nelson and Mel Martinez, as well as Dick Durbin (IL) and Charles Schumer (NY).

The same day, at least nine Haitians died off the coast of Florida, near Boynton Beach. Pregnant women and children were among the boat’s passengers. This tragedy was a sad reminder of how desperate conditions still are in Haiti, and how urgently Haitians in the U.S. need TPS.

For more information about TPS, please go to: www.tpsnow.org

Please urge President Obama to grant Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Haitians in the United States. A toll-free number for the White House comment line has been set up: 1-800-906-5989 (Call time: Monday – Friday 9 am – 5 pm EST).