Members

FLIC is a statewide organization with over 80 members throughout Florida. Our main office is in Miami-Dade, but we have team members in Broward, Palm Beach, Orange, Osceola and Duval. Through the reach of our coalition members, we guarantee pro-immigrant advocacy, education and community building across the state.

Become a member of the leading immigrant rights coalition in Florida!

FLIC’s exceptional membership includes community-based organizations, student groups, farmworker associations, legal advocates, unions, service providers, and others.

  • YAYA National Farmworker Ministry

    National

  • Women’s March of Florida

    Statewide

  • Students Working For Equal Rights (SWER)

    Miami, FL

  • Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Incorporated Alpha Zeta

    Fort lauderdale, FL

  • Florida Immigrant Youth Network FLIYN

    Statewide

  • Latino Justice PRLDEF

    Orlando, FL

  • Enterprising Latinas

    Wimauma, FL

  • Our Lady of Guadalupe NCC

    Wilton Manors, FL

  • Palm Beach County Coalition for Immigrant Rights PBCCIR

    West Palm Beach, FL

  • Board Member

    Afifa Khaliq

    SEIU Florida Public Services Union FPSU

    West Palm Beach, FL

  • FWD.us

    Washington, DC

  • Americans for Immigrant Justice AIJ

    Virginia Gardens, FL

  • Welcoming Gainesville & Alachua County

    Gainesville, FL

  • Women Working Together

    Tamarac, FL

  • AFSCME Florida

    Tallahassee, FL

  • Southern Poverty Law Center

    Tallahassee, FL

  • CAIR Florida

    Sunrise, FL

  • Youth Education Development Program YEDP

    St Augustine, FL

  • LULAC Florida

    Sarasota, FL

  • Unidos Now

    Sarasota, FL

  • Pinellas Coalition for Immigration Justice

    Saint Petersburg, FL

  • Bend the Arc Jewish Action South Florida

    Pinecrest, FL

  • American Friends Service Committee

    Philadelphia, PA

  • Florida Legal Services

    Orlando, FL

  • Board Member

    Jonathan Alingu

    Central Florida Jobs with Justice

    Orlando, FL

  • Qlatinx

    Orlando, FL

  • Las Semillas

    Orlando, FL

  • Haitian American Art Network

    Orlando, FL

  • Orlando Center for Justice

    Orlando, FL

  • Unite Here Local 737

    Orlando, FL

  • Unite Here Local 362

    Orlando, FL

  • Haitian American Chamber of Commerce of Florida

    North Miami, FL

  • Asian American Federation of Florida AAFF

    North Miami, FL

  • Florida Asian Services

    North Miami, FL

  • Latina Institute Miami

    New York, NY

  • Board Member

    Margarette Nerette

    SEIU Local 1199

    Miramar, FL

  • AFL-CIO South FL

    Miami Springs, FL

  • Unite Here Local 355

    Miami Gardens, FL

  • Ameyal Mexican Cultural Organization

    Miami Beach, FL

  • Board Member

    Trenise Bryant

    Women with Broken Heals

    Miami, FL

  • Catalyst Miami

    Miami, FL

  • Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Miami

    Miami, FL

  • Miami Workers Center

    Miami, FL

  • Community Justice Project

    Miami, FL

  • Haitian Lawyers Association

    Miami, FL

  • SEIU Local 1991

    Miami, FL

  • South Florida Interfaith Worker Justice

    Miami, FL

  • SEIU 32BJ

    Miami, FL

  • Board Member

    Ana Valentina Guevara

    Florida Student Power Network

    Miami, FL

  • Family Action Network Movement – FANM

    Miami, FL

  • Emgage Action

    Lakeland, FL

  • The Guatemalan-Maya Center, Inc.

    Lake Worth, FL

  • Food Not Bombs Lake Worth

    Lake Worth, FL

  • Central Florida AFL-CIO

    Kissimmee, FL

  • La Mesa Boricua De Florida

    Kissimmee, FL

  • Poder Latinx

    Kissimmee, FL

  • Keys Immigrant Coalition

    Key West, FL

  • Immigrant Action Alliance

    Key Largo, FL

  • Northeast Florida Immigrant Resource Alliance NEFIRA

    Jacksonville, FL

  • Unitarian Universalist Church of Jacksonville

    Jacksonville, FL

  • Florida Coastal School of Law

    Jacksonville, FL

  • Board Member

    Christian Gonzalez-Orbegoso

    Florida Rising

    Jacksonville, FL

  • The Coalition of Immokalee Workers

    Immokalee, FL

  • Board Member

    Lourdes Villanueva

    Redlands Christian Migrant Association RCMA

    Immokalee, FL

  • Alliance for Fair Food AFF

    Immokalee, FL

  • 7226 Lulac Council

    Immokalee, FL

  • Board Member

    Claudia Navarro

    WeCount!

    Homestead, FL

  • Welcoming Gainesville & Alachua County

    Gainesville, FL

  • Gainesville Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice IAIJ

    Gainesville, FL

  • Board Member

    Ethan Maia de Needell

    Rural Women’s Health Project RWHP

    Gainesville, FL

  • Human Rights Coalition of Alachua County

    Gainesville, FL

  • Latin American Coalition of Treasure Coast

    Fort Pierce, FL

  • Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Myers

    Fort Myers, FL

  • DREAMers’ Moms

    Fort Lauderdale, FL

  • Centro Campesino

    Florida City, FL

  • American Civil Liberties Union ACLU

    Coral Gables, FL

  • University of Miami School of Law Immigration Clinic

    Coral Gables, FL

  • We Are All America

    Chicago, IL

  • Sachamama

    Boynton Beach, FL

  • Young American Dreamers

    Auburndale, FL

  • Self-Help Credit Union

    Apopka, FL

  • Board Member

    Yesica Ramirez

    Farmworker Association of Florida FWAF

    Apopka, FL

  • Board Member

    Felipe Sousa Lazaballet

    Hope CommUnity Center

    Apopka, FL

Board

Afifa Khaliq

Board Chair

SEIU

Afifa Khaliq

Afifa Khaliq

Board Chair

Afifa Khaliq is the Director of Programs at SEIU Florida Public Services Union. She has been a part of a creative core team that is setting new trends and redefining labor, politics, economy, and social justice. Afifa is an unapologetic and proud Muslim. She is a founding member and secretary of the South Florida Muslim Federation. She is also the Chair of Emgage Florida, a Muslim civic engagement organization. Afifa is married, blessed with a son, and lives in West Palm Beach, Florida.

Jonathan Alingu

Central Florida Jobs with Justice

Jonathan Alingu

Jonathan Alingu

Jonathan (he/him) currently serves as a co-director for Central Florida Jobs With Justice. He has been involved in social justice organizing work for the last 10 years. First, as a student and organizer with the Student Labor Action Project chapter at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, and with the United States Student Association. He joined the Jobs With Justice network in 2014 as the membership organizer, working alongside FLIC staff and their various member groups throughout the state. Jonathan is a first-generation citizen, born to two parents that immigrated to the United States from The Bahamas via Uganda. He is also a big-time football fan, with his favorite team being Manchester City.

Christian Gonzalez-Orbegoso

Secretary

Florida Rising

Christian Gonzalez-Orbegoso

Christian Gonzalez-Orbegoso

Secretary

Christian Gonzalez-Orbegoso (he/they) is the proud North Florida Regional Director for Florida Rising. The son of immigrants from South America, who made Miami their home in the 1990s, Christian has been fighting for equity and justice throughout the state of FL through movement-building within communities of color, the state legislature, and the school system for the past 7 years.

Christian served as the esteemed Duval Organizer, Statewide Lead Organizer, and the Organizing Director for the 2018, 2020, and 2022 Florida for All statewide campaign to expand democracy and access to voting for low-propensity Black and Latinx voters. Highlights of these campaigns include the passage of Amendment 4 (2018), leading an organizational electoral outreach plan during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020), and setting the stage for progressive wins across Jacksonville, Orlando and more (2023)! Prior to 2018, they dedicated two years of public service as an AmeriCorps Member/Lead with City Year, an international education non-profit fighting to close the achievement and graduation gap in underserved communities, mainly Title-1 funded Black and Latinx schools. While serving, they were a trainer for the New Politics Leadership Foundation, a non-profit centered on training and electing community members and servant leaders to run for public office.

Previously, the proud FL Gator lived and worked in Tallahassee, FL, with the Office of FL State Representative David Richardson, the first LGBTQ+ state elected official. Christian envisions the building of an intersectional, transformative, and progressive movement in Florida that will be representative of the new majority!

Trenise Bryant

Women with Broken Heels

Trenise Bryant

Trenise Bryant

Trenise Bryant was raised in the Liberty City neighborhood in Miami, FL. Growing up, Trenise loved to play basketball and run track. Like many young girls, basketball and track wasn’t just a sport. As a survivor, sports helped Trenise during this time because it allowed her to be out of the house and be around her friends where she felt safe. Trenise went on to graduate from Miami Northwestern Senior high school and later started a decade of community activism and volunteering. She started volunteering at the Miami Workers Center in 2009 when she saw the need to give back to the community regarding Affordable Housing, even on a national level. Trenise was proud to serve her community as the past Board Chair of the Miami Workers Center (MWC) nonprofit, whose mission is to build the power and self-determination of south Florida’s most oppressed communities.

Through her passion for affordable housing, Women with Broken Heals was founded and has partnered with Smash to create the first community land trust in Liberty City. Its partnership would provide sustainable and preserved land that the community controls. Trenise is also part of the Dignity Coalition Steering committee member, advocating formerly incarcerated women to get feminine hygiene products in jail. Trenise is passionate about volunteering in the community where she grew up, especially for the Liberty Square public housing complex. Trenise strongly believes that housing is a human right and is fighting to make that right a reality. In her role as the Founder of Women with Broken Heals & CSSJ Miami, FL Chapter Coordinator Trenise has helped grow the Miami chapter, hosted dozens of healing activities, and played a crucial role in helping to bring the first Trauma Recovery Network to Miami Dade County. Through her advocacy with CSSJ and other community organizations, she has helped to pass several criminal justice and crime survivor-related legislative bills. Trenise also volunteer to make sure the un-documented community is safe and housed.

Lourdes Villanueva

Redlands Christian Migrant Association

Lourdes Villanueva

Lourdes Villanueva

Lourdes Villanueva is Director of Farmworker Advocacy for Redlands Christian Migrant Association (RCMA). She has worked for RCMA in various positions for almost 30 years, earning a college degree in the process. Ms. Villanueva is proud to come from a migrant farmworker family and wants to ensure that today’s children and families receive the same opportunities she did. She continues to promote the awareness and support of these families in local rural communities.

Felipe Sousa-Lazaballet

Treasurer

Hope CommUnity Center

Felipe Sousa-Lazaballet

Felipe Sousa-Lazaballet

Treasurer

Felipe Sousa-Lazaballet (he/they) is the newly appointed Executive Director of Hope Community Center in Apopka.

In addition to managing day-to-day operations, leading 30 staff members, overseeing the management of seven programs, and increasing financial support for the 50-year-old organization; Felipe collaborates with community advocates, supporters, leaders, and organizations throughout Central Florida to drive the interconnectedness and synergy of Hope’s programs. His first-hand understanding of the immigrant experience, his vision, passion, and power of networks have refreshed Hope’s support, empowerment, and advocacy for immigrants and others who are tenacious and courageous in the face of all systems of oppression.

Before joining Hope, Felipe was the Inclusion, Diversity & Equity Sr Specialist for the Office of Multicultural Affairs at the City of Orlando. In this position, he proposed policy recommendations and programs; advocated for best practices on LGBTQ+ issues and immigrant and refugee affairs; and directed outreach to the Muslim, Brazilian, and Haitian communities to encourage greater participation in city services.

A proud immigrant from Brazil, Felipe came to Miami when he was only 14 years old. In 2010, he walked on the Trail of Dreams, a 1,500-mile walk from Miami to Washington, DC, to share immigrant youth stories and push for administrative relief for millions of undocumented immigrants. He also worked with Presente.org, an organization seeking to solve some of the most pressing issues impacting the Latino community through communication strategies.

A graduate of Miami-Dade College with an Associate of Arts in International Relations and a bachelor’s degree in Business Studies with a Minor in Economics from St. Thomas University, Felipe was also Co-Director of GetEQUAL, a national social justice LGBTQ organization; served as the Deputy Managing Director at United We Dream, the largest immigrant youth network in the country; and worked at ThoughtWorks, a multinational software company, working at the Office of Social Change Initiatives as the Director of Strategic Partnerships.

Felipe is happily married to Luis Sousa-Lazaballet (he/him) and together they have a beautiful puppy, Cosito.

He is also on the board of Blisscares Healthcare, co-chair of Orlando’s WorldPride 2026 bid, and chair of the One Orlando Alliance board of directors.

Ethan Maia de Needell

Rural Women's Health Project

Ethan Maia de Needell

Ethan Maia de Needell

Ethan was raised in a multicultural household by an immigrant mother and a second-generation American father. Always interested in learning about other people and their history and customs, he graduated from the University of Florida with a Bachelor’s in International Studies, where he focused his research on Latin America. After graduating, he spent a year in Panama with the Peace Corps before being evacuated at the start of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Upon his return, he looked for ways to work within the community he was raised and has been working with the Rural Women’s Health Project as the Immigrant Programs Manager, where he helps to advocate and fight for a more inclusive community for the immigrant population in Gainesville and Alachua.

Yesica Ramirez

Farmworker's Association of Florida

Yesica

Yesica Ramirez

With her bubbly personality, Yesica Ramirez is our General Coordinator. Being a migrant herself, Yesica has struggled like any other migrant. She left her home and family in Michoacan, Mexico, home of the migrating Monarch butterflies. The Monarch butterflies start their 3,000 mile (about the width of the United States) migration from Canada and the United States and end up in Michoacan, Mexico.

As to leaving her home and arriving in Apopka, Florida, the first job Yesica took was as a plant nursery worker; she lasted six years there. Then, Yesica took several other jobs such as housekeeping and dishwasher. But during the years Yesica worked at the plant nursery, she had no clue about pesticides and wondered what and how she had gotten rashes on her arms and hands. She later became pregnant with her third child; her baby was born with a lot of complications. Upon birth, the baby needed to get the skull cut to get the head molded. Another long-term complication is the child has severe eczema with cold and hot weather. Throughout the time when the community members were active, fed up, and had a hint of hope for immigration reform, Yesica, along with members of the community, marched in one of FWAF’s marches in 2006. That was her introduction to the Farmworker Association of Florida. Yesica would later volunteer at another FWAF’s marches by picking up trash. When Yesica’s third child was seven months old, Yesica was invited as FWAF’s receptionist. As she became more involved with FWAF, she went on understanding and making sense of a lot of stuff such as the rashes on her hands and arms, and her child’s health complications. It made sense that during the six years she worked at the plant nursery, the smell of Clorox and alcohol would affect her pregnancy. Yesica would make this mixture with no protective gear, meaning no masks or gloves, explaining the rashes on her hands and arms. When the Apopka office had a vacant spot for the Area Organizer position, Yesica was invited to apply with only having completed middle school in Michoacan and not knowing any English. Now understanding and speaking English, Yesica has been fighting for social justice with FWAF for 12 years. She is now FWAF’s first woman General Coordinator.

Charlene Francois

Catalyst Miami

Charlene

Charlene Francois

Charlene Francois is a child of Haitian immigrants, born and raised in the US. Charlene is dynamic: In addition to her role as the Worker-Owned Business Program Manager at Catalyst Miami, she is an artist who expresses through writing and dance.

She is a former member of the Haitian folklore dance troupe, Tradisyon Lakou Lakay, led by Weislande “Yanui” Cesar and was a performer in Miami New Drama’s production of Create Dangerously, a play adapted from the novel by Edwidge Danticat.

Charlene knows firsthand that authentic creative expression and economic stability are the pillars of a healthy and thriving society. This understanding motivates her to educate individuals about the potential of worker-owned businesses to create opportunities for better wages, work conditions, and personal empowerment. She is determined to redefine and reintroduce the idea of collective, prosperous, and sustainable business ownership, especially to those who have lost hope in it. She is optimistic about our ability to work towards a more equitable tomorrow and to live alongside one another in solidarity, respect, and reverence for one another.

Charlene is a graduate of Columbia University in the City of New York (BA, 2017), a participant of the agroecology course El Josco Bravo (Mayaguez, PR), and conversational in both Haitian Creole and Spanish. She understands her travels and experiences to have prepared her perfectly for where she is now, in Miami, where she strives to serve as a bridge between cultures.

Margarette Nerette

Margarette Nerette

Margarette Nerette is currently the Vice-President of 1199 SEIU Florida. Her union represents about 30,000 Healthcare workers in the State of Florida. She has over 20 years of experience in organizing, social justice, advocacy and representing workers. 

Born in Haiti, Margarette started her career with unions in her country after the end of the dictatorship regime in the 80s.  She then became a member of the political movement “Solidarite Ant Jèn (SAJ) Veye Yo”.  After she moved in the United States in 1993, she became immensely engaged in the Haitian community of Miami.  She was among those who expended SAJ Veye Yo in the Haitian Diaspora. 

In the U.S, as a single mother of three, Margarette entered the medical field as a CNA where she started working in a nursing home.  This is how she joined 1199SEIU as a member in 1999.  A year later, she became the union’s delegate of her nursing home. In 2004, she was selected as the Member Organizer (MO) for Local11 which had merged with 32BJ. Due to her leadership and organizing skills, Margarette got promoted very fast within the union’s leadership team: from Member Organizer, to Organizer and to Lead Organizer.  In 2015, she was elected as Vice-President for the Nursing Home Division.

Margarette Nerette is the co-founder of the Miramar Haitian-American Residents and Business Owners (MHARBO) founded in 2019.  She is currently serving as the Advisor of the Board for MHARBO. 

Margarette is a hard working woman passionate about justice, equality and good job for all workers.  Despite her busy schedule, she dedicates her free time to advocate on behalf of her beloved country, Haiti.